COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES Department of Mathematics and Statistics

Jakob Streipel

I am a doctoral student studying analytic number theory, in particular modular forms in various guises, under Sheng-Chi Liu.

I am presently concerning myself with Hecke eigenform relations for Hilbert modular forms (together with Matthew Jobrack) and moments of \( GL(3) \) \( L \)-functions.

Talks

I regularly speak in various seminars. This includes past talks on:

  • Eigenform Relations for Hilbert Modular Forms, Spring 2020;
  • Equidistribution of Zeros of Polynomials, Spring 2020;
  • Mean, Meaner, Meanest Mean Value Theorems, Fall 2019;
  • Euclidean Construction of Rational Triangles of Equal Area, Fall 2019;
  • Cauchy's Functional Equation, Fall 2019;
  • Ultrametrics and \( p \)-adics, Spring 2019;
  • The Congruent Number Problem, Spring 2019;
  • Products of Eistenstein series, Fall 2018;
  • Filters, Ultrafilters, and Tychonoff's Theorem, Fall 2018;
  • Discrete Dynamical Systems (over \( \mathbb{R} \)), Spring 2018;
  • Über die Gleichverteilung von Zahlen mod. Eins (on the equidistribution of numbers modulo one), Spring 2018;
  • Discrete Dynamical Systems over Finite Fields (particularly about counting periodic points), Spring 2018;
  • Surreal Numbers, Fall 2017.

Education
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Mathematics, from Washington State University, in progress;
  • Master of Science in Mathematics, from Linnæus University in 2017;
  • Bachelor of Science in Mathematics, from Linnæus University in 2015.

Qualifying exam problems

I sometimes run review sessions in linear algebra and real analysis for the doctoral programme's qualifying exam. In doing so I have accumulated and curated sets of practice problems, found below:

Lecture notes

Occasionally I type lecture notes for courses I attend. Some of these are written quickly and without much proofing, and some are written with great care (usually because other people rely on them). Some of these notes can be found below, should they be of use to someone:

Any and all typographical errors and mistakes found herein are mine, not that of the lecturer. If you find such and would like to let me know, feel free to.

In addition, I have on two occassions had the great fortune to teach a proof based Calculus I (read: essentially real analysis) course to first year maths students. This resulted in the following set of notes, which might be of interest to someone: