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Sectioning Commands and Tables of Contents

Technical documents, like this one, are often divided into sections. Each section has a heading containing a title and a number for easy reference. LATEX has a series of commands that will allow you to identify different sorts of sections. Once you have done this LATEX takes on the responsibility of laying out the title and of providing the numbers.

The commands that you can use are:


\chapter 		 \subsection 		 \paragraph    

\section \subsubsection \subparagraph
The naming of these last two is unfortunate, since they do not really have anything to do with `paragraphs' in the normal sense of the word; they are just lower levels of section. In most document styles, headings made with \paragraph and \subparagraph are not numbered. \chapter is not available in document style article. The commands should be used in the order given, since sections are numbered within chapters, subsections within sections, etc.

A seventh sectioning command, \part, is also available. Its use is always optional, and it is used to divide a large document into series of parts. It does not alter the numbering used for any of the other commands.

Including the command \tableofcontents in you document will cause a contents list to be included, containing information collected from the various sectioning commands. You will notice that each time your document is run through LATEX the table of contents is always made up of the headings from the previous version of the document. This is because LATEX collects information for the table as it processes the document, and then includes it the next time it is run. This can sometimes mean that the document has to be processed through LATEX twice to get a correct table of contents.


next up previous
Next: Producing Special Symbols Up: Essential LATEX Previous: Type Styles
Kevin Cooper 2002-03-01