College of Arts and Sciences

Department of Mathematics

WSU Math Course Descriptions

Course Information

100

Title:

Basic Mathematics

Prerequisites: none
Comments: Course re-newal Fall 2014
Text: Course Notes for Math 100 available through Cougar Copies Course Notes available through Cougar Copies. ALEKS Semester Course Code available through the Bookie or on-line through ALEKS.com
Text Sections Covered: (1) Whole Numbers, (2) Signed Numbers, (3) Fractions, (4) Decimals, (5) Measurement & Conversions, (6) Basic Algebra, (7) Proportion & Percent, (8) Formula & Application Problems, (9) Powers & Roots, and (10) Inequalities and Absolute Value Equations and Inequalities
Comments: This course is designed to help you work through critical mathematical concepts that are needed for college level mathematics classes. We will start the class with a written pre-assessment to find out what material you personally will need to focus on, then you will start on an individualized program of self-study. Your instructor is here to help you work through any difficulties you encounter, and the on-line learning supplement will also act as your personal tutor. This course is designed for YOUR SUCCESS. Please read through the information below to learn more about how the course is structured and what the expectations will be.
Topics: na
Submitted by: Kris Johnson
Date Submitted: 12/10/14
 

Math 103

Title:

Algebra Methods and Introduction to Functions

Prerequisites: Math 100 or 30% on ALEKS exam as of 1/2014, subject to change.
Comments: Course renewal Fall 2014
Text: Intermediate Algebra with POWER Learning, Messersmith, Perez and Feldman by McGraw Hill ALEKS Student Access Code required. See instructor for your course code for this class.
Text Sections Covered: Working primarily on simplifying and factoring expressions and solving equations containing fractions, rational expressions, exponential expressions, radical expressions and graphing lines.
Comments: By the end of the course you are expected to be able to solve expressions, then solving the equations to determine a specific result. Use properties of real numbers and properties of exponents to manipulate and simplify exponential expressions and solve simple exponential equations. Use properties of real numbers, properties of radicals and properties of exponents to simplify racial expressions and solve simple radical equations. Add, subtract and multiply polynomial expressions. Use properties of real numbers and properties of exponents to factor polynomial expressions. Solve simple polynomial equations and simple absolute value equations. Set up equations to represent data given an application problem and use it to solve for a specific outcomes.
Topics: Use properties of real numbers and properties of exponents to add, subtract, multiply, divide and simplify. Recognize the difference between an algebraic expression and an algebraic equations and use this information to construct expressions from the context of real-life situation. Analyze a real-life situation and convert it into an appropriate mathematical statement. Solve linear inequalities; linear, quadratic, rational, and radical equations. Use properties of real numbers and properties of exponents to manipulate and simplify rational expressions and solve simple rational equations. Determine slopes of lines, parallel lines, and perpendicular lines. Use properties of real numbers and properties of exponents to manipulate and simplify rational expressions and solve simple rational equations. Use properties of real numbers and properties of exponents to manipulate and simplify rational expressions and solve simple rational equations.
Submitted by: Kris Johnson
Date Submitted: 12/12/14
 

Math 105

Title:

Exploring Mathematics

Prerequisites: Math 101 or 103 or satisfactory math placement score.
Comments: [N]
Text: Introduction to Mathematics, by Karl Smith, Published by Cengage Learning.
Text Sections Covered: Prologue; 1.1 Problem Solving; 2.2 Operations with Sets; 2.3 Applications of Sets; 10.1 Exponential Equations; 10.2 Logarithmic Equations; 10.3 Applications of Growth and Decay; 11.1 Interest; 11.2 Installment Buying; 11.3 Sequences; 11.4 Series; 11.5 Annuities; 11.6 Amortization; 11.7 Summary of Financial Formulas; 12.1 Permutations; 12.2 Combinations; 12.3 Counting Without Counting; 13.1 Introduction to Probability; 13.2 Mathematical Expectation; 13.3 Probability Models; 13.4 Calculated Probabilities; 14.1 Frequency Distributions and Graphs; 14.2 Descriptive Statistics; 14.3 The Normal Curve; 17.1 Voting; 17.2 Voting Dilemmas.
Comments: Beginning Fall 2008, Math 210 has been changed to Math 105.
Topics: Integers, Rational Numbers, Irrational Numbers, and Real Numbers; Linear Equations; Fundamental Counting Principle, Permutations, and Combinations; Fundamentals of Probability, Conditional Probability; Frequency Distributions, Normal Distribution, Measures of Central Tendency, Measures of Dispersion, Correlation and Regression.
Submitted by: Jeanette Martin
Date Submitted: 4/21/09
 

Math 106

Title:

College Algebra

Prerequisites: Math 101 or 103 with a grade of C or better or satisfactory math placement score.
Comments: Graphs, properties and applications of polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions
Text: Precalculus by Eric Schulz, Julianne Connell Sachs, William Briggs and Lyle Cochran. This is an eBook published by Pearson. MyMathLab Explorations and Notes.
Text Sections Covered: Class will work with polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. For each class of functions, you will study the domains, ranges, graphs, special properties and application. By the end of the course you should understand their properties, the shapes of their graphs and be able to solve problems and equations involving the. These are the functions that will be used in later classes as calculus, physics, biology and engineering.
Comments: Credit not granted for both Math 106 and Math 107.
Topics: Understand and apply quantitative principles and methods to define, analyze and solve problems. Integrate and synthesize knowledge and different techniques to solve problems. Draw conclusions from computational and symbolic representations in order to check the logic and validity of statement and models. Clearly communicate your reasoning and findings. Use properties of real numbers and properties of exponents to maniulate and simplify mathematical expressions. Solve: linear equations and inequalities; absolute value equations and inequalities, rational, radical and polynomial equations; polynomial and rational inequalities; exponential and logarithmic equations. Read and create representations of data using tables and graphs, interpret this information in the context of a real-life situation and determine whether your answer makes sense in the context of the problems.
Submitted by: Kris Johnson
Date Submitted: 12/14/14
 

Math 107

Title:

Precalculus

Prerequisites: Math 107 has been replaced by accelerated Math 106/108 (FALL ONLY)
Comments: Real Numbers, Exponents, Radicals, Algebraic Expressions (and factoring), Rational, Expressions, Solving Equations Algebraically, Modeling with Equations, Inequalities, Coordinate Geometry, Solving Equations Graphically, Solving Inequalities Graphically, Lines.
Text: -
Text Sections Covered: 1.10 lines; 1.11 modeling variation; 2.1 what is a function? - 2.8 one-to-one functions and their inverses; 3.1 polynomial functions and their graphs - 3.6 rational functions; 4.1 exponential functions - 4.5 modeling with exponential and logarithmic functions; 5.1 the unit circle - 5.4 more trigonometric graphs; 6.1 angle measure - 6.3 trigonometric functions of angles; 7.1 trigonometric identities - 7.5 trigonometric equations.
Comments: Math 107 information is for historical value. It it no longer being offered by WSU-Pullman.
Topics: The Fundamental Theorem of Algebra, rational functions and their graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions and their graphs, properties of logs, solving exponential & logarithmic equations, exponential & logarithmic models, the unit circle, angle measurement
Submitted by: Kris Johnson
Date Submitted: 12/12/14
 

Math 108

Title:

Trigonometry

Prerequisites: Math 106 with a grade of C or better. ALEKS assessment is NOT use to place into Math 108.
Comments: Graphs, properties and applications of trigonometric functions.
Text: Precalculus by Eric Schulz, Julianne Connell Sachs, William Briggs and Lyle Cochran. This is an eBook published by Pearson. MyMathLab Explorations and Notes by Eric Schulz and Julianne Connell Sachs.
Text Sections Covered: You will learn the trigonometric functions as derived from the unity circle and from right triangles and the trigonometric identities. For each class of functions, you will study the domains, ranges, transformations, graphs, special properties and applications. By the end of the course you should understand all these concepts and be able to solve problems and equations involving all six trigonometric functions. These functions that will be used in classes such as calculus, physics, biology and engineering.
Comments: Develop learning skills that are important for your success in this and future courses. Understand and apply quantitative principles and methods to define, analyze and solve problems. Integrate and synthesize knowledge and different techniques to solve problems. Draw conclusions from computational and symbolic representations in order to check the logic and validity of statements and models. Clearly communicate your reasoning and findings.
Topics: Concepts of radian and degree and convert from one to the other. Circle definitions and right triangle definitions of the six trigonometric functions. Use the six inverse trigonometric functions to find angles. Know the properties of the trigonometric functions Identify periodic functions and their periods.
Submitted by: Kris Johnson
Date Submitted: 12/12/14
 

Math 110

Title:

Mathematics Tutorial for Math 107

Prerequisites: Must be currently enrolled in 107.
Comments: Support course for Math 107.
Text: -
Text Sections Covered: -
Comments: -
Topics: As the tutorial for Precalculus, Math 110 emphasizes and reviews key concepts and skills required for Math 107. To this end, this course supplies facilities and time for individual work on ALEKS, an online tutoring program required for Math 107 (see website: www.aleks.com). The rest of the class time is geared towards general review and Q&A, where students work individually or in small groups.
Submitted by: Corby Harwood
Date Submitted: 12/07/09
 

Math 111

Title:

Mathematics Tutorial for Math 201

Prerequisites: Must be currently enrolled in Math 201
Comments: Support course for Math 201.
Text: -
Text Sections Covered: -
Comments: -
Topics: Content in this course is aligned with specific content of Math 201. Specifically, students will focus on correctly and efficiently performing algebraic manipulations on a variety of function types including, but not limited to, linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic.
Submitted by: Christy Jacobs
Date Submitted: 6/18/07
 

Math 140

Title:

Calculus for Life Science

Prerequisites: Math 107 with a grade of C or better, or Satisfactory math placement score.
Comments: Credit not normally granted for more than one of Math 140, 171, 202, 206.
Text: Calculus for the Life Sciences by Greenwell, Ritchey, & Lial. First edition, published by Addison Wesley.
Text Sections Covered: Selected material from chapters 1-11.
Comments: Limits, Derivatives and Differentiation, Applications, Integration and Integration Techniques, Multivariable Calculus, Differential Equations
Topics: Review of relevant precalculus material as well as differential calculus, integral calculus, and multivariable calculus with relevant life science applications.
Submitted by: Elissa Schwartz
Date Submitted: 4/27/09
 

Math 151

Title:

Calculus for Middle School Teachers

Prerequisites: Math 107 with a C grade or better.
Comments: Differential and integral calculus in relation to middle school mathematics and real world problems through visualization, hands-on activities and technology
Text: --
Text Sections Covered: --
Comments: --
Topics: -
Submitted by: DongMei Liu
Date Submitted: 12/08/09
 

Math 171

Title:

Calculus 1

Prerequisites: Math 107 or satisfactory math placement score transfer credit, SAT, ACT score
Comments: Credit not normally granted for more than one of Math 140, 171, 202, 206.
Text: Essential Calculus - Early Transcendentals, by James Stewart, ISBN 0-495-01428-1
Text Sections Covered: Sections selected from Chapters 1 through 5. Chapter 1. Functions and Models. Chapter 2. Limits and Derivatives. Chapter 3. Differentiation Rules. Chapter 4. Applications of Differentiation. Chapter 5. Integrals.
Comments: This course will cover "Fundamental concepts of calculus, calculation techniques and applications of limits, derivatives and integrals for single variable functions".
Topics: Limits and derivatives, Continuity, Differentiation rules, Applications of derivatives. An introduction to definite and indefinite integrals, including the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.
Submitted by: Hong-Ming Yin
Date Submitted: 4/22/09
 

Math 172

Title:

Calculus II

Prerequisites: Math 171
Comments: -
Text: Essentials Calculus - Early Transcendentals, by James Stewart; Published by Brooks & Cole, ISBN 0-495-01428-1
Text Sections Covered: Sections selected from Chapters 6-9 and the first half of Chapter 10. Chapter 6 - Techniques of Integration. Chapter 7 - Applications of Integration. Chapter 8 - Series. Chapter 9 - Parametric Equations and Polar Coordinates. Chapter 10 - Vectors and the Geometry of Space.
Comments: -
Topics: Techniques and applications of integration, Infinite sequences and series, parametric equations, Polar coordinates, Three-dimensional vectors and the geometry of space
Submitted by: Don Leo
Date Submitted: 1/7/2011
 

Math 182

Title:

Honors Calculus II

Prerequisites: Math 171 or permission from the instructor
Comments: -
Text: Essentials Calculus/Early Transcendentals, 1st Edition by Stewart; Published by Brooks & Cole
Text Sections Covered: Chapters 6-12: Chapter 6. Applications of Integration; Chapter 7. Techniques of Integration; Chapter 8. Further Applications of Integration; Chapter 9. Differential Equations; Chapter 10. Parametric Equations and Polar Coordinates; Chapter 11. Infinite Sequences and Series; Chapter 12. Vectors and the Geometry of Space.
Comments: -
Topics: Applications and techniques of integration, introduction to differential equations, parametric equations and polar coordinates, infinite series and sequences, vectors and the geometry of space.
Submitted by: William Webb
Date Submitted: 7/5/07
 

Math 201

Title:

Mathematics for Business and Economics

Prerequisites: Math 101 or 103 with a grade of C or better or satisfactory math placement score.
Comments: Mathematical analysis using polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions; linear systems, linear programming and probability, for business and economic applications.
Text: Introductory Mathematical Analysis for Business, Economics and the Life and Social Sciences, (custom) 12th Edition by E. Hauessler, R. Paul & R. Wood; Published by Pearson/Prentice Hall
Text Sections Covered: 0.7 Linear Equations; 0.8 Quadratic Equations; 1.1 Applications of Equations; 1.2 Linear Inequalities; 1.3 Applications of Inequalities; 1.4 Absolute Value; 1.5 Summation Notation; 2.1 Functions; 2.2 Special Functions; 2.3 Combinations of Functions; 2.4 Inverse Functions; 2.5 Graphs in Rectangular Coordinates; 2.6 Symmetry; 2.7 Translation & Reflection; 3.1 Lines; 3.2 Applications and Linear Functions; 3.3 Quadratic Functions; 3.4 Systems of Linear Equations; 3.5 Nonlinear Systems; 3.6 Applications of Systems of Equations; 4.1 Exponential Functions; 4.2 Logarithmic Functions; 4.3 Properties of Logarithms; 4.4 Logarithmic and Exponential Equations; 6.1 Matrices; 6.2 Matrix Addition and Scalar Multiplication; 6.3 Matrix Multiplication; 6.4 and 6.5 Solving Systems by Reducing Matrices; 6.6 Inverses; 7.1 Linear Inequalities in Two Variables; 7.2 Linear Programming; 7.4 The Simplex Method; 8.1 Basic Counting Principle and Permutations; 8.2 Combinations and Other Counting Principles; 8.3 Sample Spaces & Events; 8.4 Probability
Comments: -
Topics: Recognition and solution of linear, fractional, radical, quadratic equations; solution of linear and absolute-value inequalities; definition of a function; recognition and graphing of linear and quadratic functions; recognition and solution of linear and non-linear systems of equations using substitution; matrix algebra; recognition and solution of linear systems of equations using elimination, matrix reduction, matrix inversion; solution of linear programming problems by graphing (using the corner-point principle) and by using the Simplex method; permutations, combinations, and other basic counting principles.
Submitted by: Carolyn Smith
Date Submitted: 12/08/09
 

Math 202

Title:

Calculus for Business and Economics

Prerequisites: Math 107 or 201 with a grade of C or better, or satisfactory math placement score.
Comments: Differential and integral calculus of the polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions.
Text: Mathematics for business, Economics, Life Sciences and Social Sciences, Barnett, Ziegler, Byleen
Text Sections Covered: 10.1, Introduction to Limits; 10.2, Infinite Limits and Limits at Infinity; 10.3, Continuity; 10.4, The Derivative; 10.5, Basic Differentiation Properties; !0.6, Differentials; 10.7, Marginal Analysis in Business and Economics; 11.1, The Constant e and Continuous Compound Interest; 11.2, Derivatives of Exponential and Logarithmic Functions; 11.3, Derivatives of Products and Quotients; 11.4, The Chain Rule; 11.5, Implicit Differentiation; 11.6, Related Rates; 12.1, First Derivative and Graphs; 12.2, Second Derivative and Graphs; 12.3, L’Hopital’s Rule; 12.4, Curve Sketching Techniques; 12.5, Absolute Maxima and Minima; 12.6, Optimization; 13.1, Antiderivatives and Indefinite Integrals; 13.2, Integration by Substitution; 13.4, the Definite Integral; 13.5, The Fundamental Theorem of Integral Calculus; 14.1, Area between Curves; 14.2, Applications in Business and Economics; 15.1, Functions of Several Variables; 15.2, Partial Derivatives
Comments: Credit not normally granted for more than one of Math 140, 171, 202, 206.
Topics: Limits, The Derivative and Rules; Implicit Differentiation, Related Rates, Curve Sketching (graphing), L’Hopital’s Rule, Optimization, Antiderivatives and Indefinite Integrals and Rules, Definite Integrals and The Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, Applications of Definite Integrals, Introduction to Multivariable Calculus
Submitted by: Carolyn Smith
Date Submitted: 8/19/2011
 

Math 205

Title:

Statistical Thinking

Prerequisites: Math 103 or satisfactory math placement score
Comments: -
Text: Statistical Reasoning for Everyday Life; 2nd Ed. by J. Bennet, W. Briggs and M. Triloa; Published by Addison Wesley
Text Sections Covered: Chapter 1. Speaking of Statistics; Chapter 2. Measurement in Statistics; Chapter 3. Visual Displays of Data; Chapter 4. Describing Data; Chapter 5. A Normal World; Chapter 6. Probability in Statistics; Chapter 7. Correlation and Causality; Chapter 8. From Samples to Populations; Chapter 9. Hypothesis Testing; Chapter 10. Further Applications of Statistics.
Comments: -
Topics: What is/are statistics, sampling, types of statistical study, data types, errors, uses of percentages in statistical, frequency tables, graphs, averages, properties of the Normal Distribution, basics of probability, probabilities with large numbers,
Submitted by: V. Krishna Jandhyala
Date Submitted: 5/12/08
 

Math 206

Title:

Calculus for Architects

Prerequisites: Math 107 with a grade C or better or satisfactory math placement score.
Comments: Calculus of elementary functions; trigonometry; applications to architects. Credit not normally granted for more than one of Math 140, 171, 202, 206.
Text: Brief Calculus & Its Applications, 11th Edition by Goldstein, Lay, Asmar & Schneider. Published by Prentice Hall
Text Sections Covered: 1.1 The Slope of a Straight Line; 1.2 The Slope of a Curve at a Point; 1.3 The Derivative; 1.4 Limits and the Derivative; 1.5 Differentiability and Continuity; 1.6 Some Rules for Differentiation 1.7 More About Derivatives; 1.8 The Derivative as a Rate of Change; 2.1 Describing Graphs of Functions; 2.2 The First and Second Derivative Rules; 2.3 The First and Second Derivative Tests and Curve Sketching; 2.4 Curve Sketching (Conclusion); 2.5 Optimization Problems; 2.6 Further Optimization Problems; 3.1 The Product and Quotient Rules; 3.2 The Chain Rule and the General Power Rule; 3.3 Implicit Differentiation and Related Rates; 4.1 Exponential Functions 4.2 The Exponential Function e^x; 4.3 Differentiation of Exponential Functions; 4.4 The Natural Logarithm Function; 4.5 The Derivative of ln x; 4.6 Properties of the Natural Logarithm Function; 5.1 Exponential Growth and Decay; 5.2 Compound Interest; 5.4 Further Exponential Models; 6.1 Antidifferentiation; 6.2 Areas and Riemann Sums; 6.3 Definite Integrals and the Fundamental Theorem; 6.4 Areas in the xy-Plane; 6.5 Applications of the Definite Integral; 6.6 Techniques of Integration; 6.7 Improper Integrals; 8.1 Radian Measure of Angles; 8.2 The Sine and the Cosine; 8.3 Differentiation and Integration of sin t and cos t; 8.4 The Tangent and Other Trigonometric Functions
Comments: ALEKS: This is a web-based assessment and learning system that uses adaptive questioning to help a student determine which background areas, if any, need strengthening. Since success in calculus depends on mastery of algebra and precalculus, you will be required to demonstrate mastery of these topics via ALEKS in the first five weeks of the course. PROJECT: Many ideas in calculus can be explored using software packages such as Maple. This project will give you the opportunity to explore the concepts we are learning without having to spend time on lengthy calculations. This assignment will be worked individually and will involve the use of the internet
Topics: See above
Submitted by: Jeanette Martin
Date Submitted: 12/08/2009
 

Math 210

Title:

Introduction to Mathematics --(Replaced by Math 105 beginning Fall 2008)

Prerequisites: -Math 101 or 103 or satisfactory math placement score.
Comments: -Math 105 replaces Math 210 as of Fall 2008.
Text: -Mathematics Beyond the Numbers, by G.T. Gilbert and R.L. Hatcher, Published by Wiley & Sons.
Text Sections Covered: -Chapter 1. Problem Solving and Critical Thinking; 1.1 Inductive and Deductive Reasoning; 1.2 Estimation and Graphs; 1.3 Problem Solving; Chapter 5. Number Theory and the Real Number System; 5.2 The Integers; Order of Operations; 5.3 The Rational Numbers; 5.4 The Irrational Numbers; 5.5 Real Numbers and Their Properties; 5.6 Exponents and Scientific Notation; 6.2 Solving Linear Equations; 7.4 Exponential Functions; Chapter 8. Consumer Mathematics and Financial Management; 8.1 Percent; 8.2 Simple Interest; 8.3 Compound Interest; 8.4 Installment Buying; 8.5 The Cost of Home Ownership; 8.6 Investing in Stocks, Bonds, and Mutual Funds; Chapter 11. Counting Methods and Probability Theory; 11.1 The Fundamental Counting Principle; 11.2 Permutations; 11.3 Combinations; 11.4 Fundamentals of Probability; 11.5 Fundamental Counting Principle, Permutations, and Combinations; 11.6 Events Involving "Not" and "Or"; Odds; 11.7 Events Involving "And"; Conditional Probability; 11.8 Expected Value; Chapter 12. Statistics. 12.1 Sampling, Frequency Distributions, and Graphs; 12.2 Measures of Central Tendency; 12.3 Measures of Dispersion; 12.4 The Normal Distribution; 12.5 Scatter Plots, Correlation, and Regression Lines.
Comments: -Beginning Fall 2008, Math 210 has been changed to Math 105.
Topics: -Integers, Rational Numbers, Irrational Numbers, and Real Numbers; Linear Equations; Fundamental Counting Principle, Permutations, and Combinations; Fundamentals of Probability, Conditional Probability; Frequency Distributions, Normal Distribution; Measures of Central Tendency, Measures of Dispersion; Correlation and Regression
Submitted by: -Claudia M. Pacioni
Date Submitted: 5/12/08
 

Math 212

Title:

Introduction to Statistical Methods

Prerequisites: Math 99 or placement test score
Comments: -
Text: Statistics, The Art & Science of Learning from Data; by Agresti & Franklin, Published by Pearson/Prentice Hall. Statistics, The Exploration & Analysis of Data(w/CD-Rom, Info Trac & Internet Companion); 5th Ed. by Devore & Peck; Published by Thompson/Duxbury
Text Sections Covered: -
Comments: Taught by Statistics Department.
Topics: -
Submitted by: Catalog
Date Submitted: -
 

Math 216

Title:

Discrete Structures

Prerequisites: Math 107, Phil 201 and a programming course.
Comments: -
Text: Discrete Structures and its Applications; 6th ed. by K. Rosen; Publisher McGraw-Hill
Text Sections Covered: Chapter 1: Logic and basic proofs; Chapter 2: Set theory; Chapter 3: Algorithms, integers and matricies; Chapter 4: Induction, Recursion; Chapter 5: Counting; Chapter 6: Discrete Probability; Chapter 8: Relations; Chapter 9: Graphs; Chapter 10: Trees;
Comments: -
Topics: logic & set theory; proofs; combinatorics; number theory; graph theory; probability; algorithms; computer science and engineering applications
Submitted by: Anna Johnston
Date Submitted: 4/22/09
 

Math 220

Title:

Introductory Linear Algebra

Prerequisites: Math 171 or c//.
Comments: Credit will not be granted for both Math 220 and 230. This course is offered every semester, including summer.
Text: Linear Algebra and Its Applications by D. Lay, 3rd Edition (updated); Published by Pearson/Addison Wesley
Text Sections Covered: Chapter 1. Linear Equations in Linear Algebra; 1.1 Systems of Linear Equations; 1.2 Row Reduction and Echelon Forms; 1.3 Vector Equations; 1.4 The Matrix Equation Ax = b; 1.5 Solution Sets of Linear Systems; 1.7 Linear Independence; 1.8 Introduction to Linear Transformation; 1.9 The Matrix of a Linear Transformation; 1.10 Linear Models in Business, Science, and Engineering; Supplementary Exercises. Chapter 2. Matrix Algebra; 2.1 Matrix Operations; 2.2 The Inverse of a Matrix; 2.3 Characterizations of Invertable Matrices; 2.8 4.1-4.3 Subspaces of R^n; 2.9 4.5-4.6 Dimension and Rank; Chapter 3. Determinants; 3.1 Introduction to Determinants; 3.2 Properties of Determinants; Chapter 4. 4.9 Applications to Markov Chains; Chapter 5. Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors; 5.1 Eigenvectors and Eigenvalues; 5.2 The Characteristic Equation; 5.6 Discrete Dynamical Systems; Chapter 6. Orthogonality and Least Squares; 6.1 Inner Product, Length, and Orthogonality; 6.2 Orthogonal Sets; 6.4 The Gram-Schmidt Process.
Comments: -
Topics: Linear equations, Matrix algebra, Determinants, Eigenvalues, Vector spaces, Orthogonality and least squares
Submitted by: Michael Tsatsomeros
Date Submitted: 4/22/09
 

Math 230

Title:

Honors Introductory Linear Algebra

Prerequisites: Math 171 or c//.
Comments: Credit will not be granted for both Math 220 and 230. The course is only offered in the Spring semester.
Text: Linear Algebra and Its Applications Update, 3rd edition, D. Lay; Published by Pearson/Addison Wesley
Text Sections Covered: Chapter 1. Linear Equations in Linear Algebra; 1.1 Systems of Linear Equations; 1.2 Row Reduction and Echelon Forms; 1.3 Vector Equations; 1.4 The Matrix Equation Ax = b; 1.5 Solution Sets of Linear Systems; 1.6 Applications of Linear Systems; 1.7 Linear Independence; 1.8 Introduction to Linear Transformation; 1.9 The Matrix of a Linear Transformation; 1.10 Linear Models in Business, Science, and Engineering Supplementary Exercises. Chapter 2. Matrix Algebra; ; 2.1 Matrix Operations; 2.2 The Inverse of a Matrix; 2.3 Characterizations of Invertible Matrices; Chapter 3. Determinants; 3.1 Introduction to Determinants; 3.2 Properties of Determinants; 3.3 Cramers Rule, Volume, and Linear Transformations; Chapter 4. Vector Spaces; 4.1 Vector Spaces and Subspaces; 4.2 Null Spaces, Column Spaces, and Linear Transformation; 4.3 Linearly Independent Sets; Bases; 4.4 Coordinate Systems; 4.5 The Dimension of a Vector Space; 4.6 Rank; Chapter 5. Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors; 5.1 Eigenvectors and Eigenvalues; 5.2 The Characteristic Equation; 5.3 Diagonalization; Chapter 6. Orthogonality and Least Squares; 6.1 Inner Product, Length, and Orthogonality; 6.2 Orthogonal Sets; 6.3 Orthogonal Projections; 6.4 The Gram-Schmidt Process.
Comments: --
Topics: Linear equations, Matrix algebra, Determinants, Eigenvalues, Vector spaces, Orthogonality
Submitted by: Judi McDonald
Date Submitted: 4/27/09
 

Math 251

Title:

Math for Elementary School Teachers I

Prerequisites: Satisfactory math placement score (21 or better on the Intermediate Exam, or 13 or better on the Advanced Exam) or having passed Math 103, 107 or a higher level Math course.
Comments: -
Text: Mathematical Reasoning for Elementary Teachers w/Geometers Sketchpad, 4th Edition by C. Long & D.DeTemple; Published by Addison Wesley
Text Sections Covered: 1.1 An Introduction to Problem Solving; 1.2 Polyas Problem-Solving Principles; 1.3 More Problem-Solving Strategies; 1.5 Reasoning Mathematically; 2.1 Sets and Operations on Sets; 2.2 Sets, Counting, and the Whole Numbers; 2.3 Addition and Subtraction of Whole Numbers; 2.4 Multiplication and Division of Whole Numbers; 3.1 Numeration Systems Past and Present; 3.2 Non-decimal Positional Systems; 3.3 Algorithms for Adding and Subtracting Whole Numbers; 3.4 Algorithms for Multiplication and Division of Whole Numbers; 3.5 Mental Arithmetic and Estimation; 4.1 Divisibility of Natural Numbers; 4.2 Tests for Divisibility; 4.3 Greatest Common Divisors and Least Common Multiples; 5.1 Representation of Integers; 5.2 Addition and Subtraction of Integers; 5.3 Multiplication and Division of Integers; 6.1 The Basic Concepts of Fractions and Rational Numbers; 6.2 The Arithmetic of Rational Numbers; 6.3 The Rational Number System; 7.1 Decimals; 7.2 Computations with Decimals; 7.3 Ratio and Proportion; 7.4 Percent.
Comments: -
Topics: Logical and historical development of present-day number systems and associated algorithms, methods of problem solving. An introduction to problem solving, Polyas 4 Problem-Solving Principles, problem-solving strategies, sets and operations on sets, counting, and the whole numbers, addition and subtraction of whole numbers, multiplication and division of whole numbers, non-decimal positional systems, algorithms for adding and subtracting whole numbers, algorithms for multiplication and division of whole numbers, mental arithmetic and estimation, divisibility of natural numbers, tests for divisibility, greatest common divisors and least common multiples, representation of integers, addition and subtraction on integers, multiplication and division of integers, basic concepts of fractions and rational numbers, the arithmetic of rational numbers, the rational numbers system, decimals, computations with decimals, ratio and proportion, percent.
Submitted by: Jeanette Martin
Date Submitted: 4/23/09
 

Math 252

Title:

Math for Elementary School Teachers II

Prerequisites: One year high school geometry, C or better in Math 251.
Comments: -
Text: Mathematical Reasoning for Elementary Teachers w/Geometers Sketchpad, 4th Edition by C. Long & D. DeTemple; Published by Addison Wesley
Text Sections Covered: 9.1 The Graphical Representation of Data; 9.2 Measures of Central Tendency and Variability; 9.3 Statistical Inference; 10.1 Empirical Probability; 10.2 Principles of Counting; 10.3 Theoretical Probability; 11.1 Figures in the Plane; 11.2 Curves and Polygons in the Plane; 11.3 Figures in Space; 12.1 The Measurement Process; 12.2 Area and Perimeter; 12.3 The Pythagorean Theorem; 12.4 Surface Area and Volume; 13.1 Rigid Motion and Similarity Transformation; 13.2 Pattern and Symmetries; 13.3 Tiling and Escher-like Designs;
Optional Sections if Time Permits:
14.1 Congruent Triangles; 14.2 Constructing Geometric Figures; 14.3 Similar Triangle.
Comments: -
Topics: Informal approach to basic ideas; measurement, geometrical constructions, similarity, congruence, symmetry, probability, counting principles, measures of central tendency, graphical representation.
Submitted by: Kim Vincent
Date Submitted: 4/23/09
 

Math 273

Title:

Calculus III

Prerequisites: Math 172 with a grade C or better.
Comments: Calculus of functions of several variables.
Text: Essential Calculus (Early Transcendentals), by J. Stewart; Published by Brooks & Cole
Text Sections Covered: We will cover chapters 10.6 - 13.9.
Comments: -
Topics: Vector functions and vector curves, curvature, motion in space, functions of several variables, limits and continuity, partial derivatives, tangent planes, directional derivatives, maximum and minimum values, Lagrange multipliers, double and triple integrals, change of variables in such integrals, line integrals, Greens Theorem, parametric surfaces, surface areas, Stokes and Divergence Theorem.
Submitted by: Alexander Panchenko
Date Submitted: 4/23/09
 

Math 283

Title:

Honors Calculus III

Prerequisites: Math 172 or 182 and instructor consent
Comments: This is the honors version of Math 273
Text: Essential Calculus - Early Transcendentals, by James Stewart; Published by Brooks & Cole
Text Sections Covered: We will cover sections 10.6 - 13.9
Comments: Double integrals over rectangles, general regions, polar coordinates, applications of double integrals, surface area, triple integrals in Cylindrical and Spherical coordinates, change of variables in Multi Integrals, Vector calculus, fields, line Integral
Topics: vector functions, motion in space, curvature, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, directional derivatives, tangent planes, applications to maximum and minimum values, Lagrange multipliers, multiple integrals, change of variables, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, line and surface integrals, parametric surfaces, Greens Theorem, Stokes Theorem and the Divergence Theorem.
Submitted by: William Webb
Date Submitted: 5/14/08
 

MATH 300

Title:

Mathematical Computing

Prerequisites: Math 220
Comments: Examinations of some current computer software for solving mathematical problems.
Text: Materials from Internet and tutorial books for software packages.
Text Sections Covered: ----
Comments: All of these will be presented within a framework of analysis of an approximation problem.
Topics: The Internet and local networks
Mathematical Analysis tools
Mathematical Typesetting tools
Unix and Windows operating systems
Submitted by: KEVIN COOPER
Date Submitted: 6/26/07
 

MATH 301

Title:

Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning

Prerequisites: Math 220
Comments: This course is only offered in the Spring semester.
Text: Mathematical Reasoning, Writing, & Proof, 2nd Ed. by Ted Sundstrom; Published by Pearson/Prentice Hall
Text Sections Covered: Most sections of Part I- Foundations of Logic and Proof Writing, selected sections from Part II- Basic Principals of Analysis and selected sections from Part III- Basic Principles of Algebra.
Comments: Intro to Logic, If-Then Statements, Universal & Existential Quantifiers, Negations of Statements, Proofs Involving Set, Indexed Families of Sets, Algebraic and Ordering Properties of R, The Principal of Mathematical Induction, Equivalence Relations
Topics: Logic, sets, direct and indirect proof, proof writing, mathematical induction, counterexamples, functions and relations, topics in number theory and set theory, problem solving
Submitted by: Libby Knott
Date Submitted: 6/24/09
 

Math 302

Title:

Theory of Numbers

Prerequisites: Math 172, 220
Comments: Divisibility properties of integers; congruences; Diophantine equations; quadratic residues.
Text: Elementary Introduction to Number Theory, 3rd Edition by Long; Published by Waveland Press
Text Sections Covered: Chapters 1-6, 8
Comments: -
Topics: Primes, Divisibility Properties of the Integers, Congruences, Number Theoretic Functions, Applications to Cryptology
Submitted by: William Webb
Date Submitted: 4/24/09
 

Math 303

Title:

Geometry for the Middle School Teacher

Prerequisites: MATH 220 with a C or better or MATH 230 with a C or better
Comments: Topics in 2D and 3D geometry including technology-based reasoning and exploration, deductive arguments, transformational and proportional reasoning, and non-Euclidean geometries.
Text: -
Text Sections Covered: ----
Comments: -
Topics: -
Submitted by: Kris
Date Submitted: 6/5/13
 

MATH 315

Title:

Differential Equations

Prerequisites: Math 273 with a grade C or better; Math 220 with a C or better or c//.
Comments: Linear differential equations and systems; series, numerical and qualitative approaches; applications. (material in Multivariable Calculus and Linear Algebra will be used)
Text: Elementary Differential Equations and Boundary Value Problems, 8th Edition by W. Boyce & R. DiPrima; Published by Wiley, 2005.
Text Sections Covered: Chapters 1-7 (1.1-7.9)
Comments: Student Solutions Manual Elementary Differential Equations by W.E. Boyce and R. C. DiPrima, 7th Edition (Optional)
Topics: Classification of differential equations
First order differential equations
General theory of higher order linear differential equations
Equations with constant coefficients
Methods of undetermined coefficients and variation of parameters
Series solutions of second order linear equations
Laplace Transform
Systems of first order linear differential equations
Submitted by: Eric Remaley
Date Submitted: 4/23/09
 

Math 320

Title:

Elementary Modern Algebra

Prerequisites: Math 220
Comments: -
Text: Instructor's Lecture Notes
Text Sections Covered: -
Comments: -
Topics: We will cover the rudiments of modern algebra and their application to solving polynomial equations, particularly the determination of the solvability of the quintic polynomial. Furthermore, time permitting, the classical Greek problems will be briefly discussed. Close attention will be paid to the historical development of the algebraic concepts with the intent of demonstrating how modern algebraic concepts arose from the problem of solving polynomial equations. The Application of these algebraic concepts to the above-mentioned problems will be examined, and other uses will be discussed.
Submitted by: Mike Kallaher
Date Submitted: 3/9/06
 

MATH 325

Title:

Elementary Combinatorics

Prerequisites: Math 220 with a C or better
Comments: Introduction to combinatorial theory: counting methods, binomial coefficients and identities, generating functions, recurrence relations, principle of inclusion-exclusion methods.
Text: Introductory Combinatorics, 4th Edition, by R. Brualdi; Published by Prentice Hall
Text Sections Covered: Chapters 1, 2, 3, 5-8, and 14 if time allows. 1: What is Combinatorics ?, 2: The Pigenhole Principle, 3: Permutations and Combinations, 4: Generating Permutations and Combinations, 5: The Binomial Coefficients, 6: The Inclusion-Exclusion Principle and Applications, 7: Recurrence Relations & Generating Functions, 8: Special Counting Sequences, 14: Polya Counting
Comments: Develop proficiencies in problem solving, mathematical modeling, written and oral communication. Become skillful in combinatorial reasoning and its applications.
Topics: Pigeonhole Principle, Permutations and Combinations, Binomial Coefficients, Identities, Inclusion-Exclusion Principle, Generating Functions, Recurrence Sequences, Special Counting Sequences (Catalan numbers, Stirling numbers, Partitions), Polya Counting
Submitted by: Duane DeTemple
Date Submitted: 4/23/09
 

Math 330

Title:

Methods of Teaching Secondary Mathematics

Prerequisites: Linear Algebra--Math 220; intention on becoming a secondary mathematics teacher
Comments: -
Text: No text book required, however, you are required to purchase a bundle of software.
Software Bundle includes: Geometers Sketchpad (version 4), Fathom and Tinker Tots. Key College Publishing Co.
Text Sections Covered: Various articles will be supplied or put on reserve in Brain Education Library in Cleveland Hall, throughout the semester.
Comments: -
Topics: Each of you will be able:
to create and implement effective pedagogical strategies
incorporate collaborative learning and appropriate technology
design a variety of assessment tools
connect mathematics to the real world
incorporate inclusive teaching strategies
acquire knowledge of the state learning goals and Essential Academic Learning Requirements by
(a) demonstrating knowledge of the goals
(b) demonstrating skill in developing curriculum, instruction, and assessment of students in grades 4-12 Washington Math Standards, and
(c) demonstrating the ability to have a positive impact on 4-12 students learning in the Washington Math Standard
Submitted by: Kim Vincent
Date Submitted: 7/6/07
 

Math 340

Title:

Introduction to Mathematical Biology

Prerequisites: Math 140, 172, and 3 hours of biology.
Comments: Mathematical biology and development of mathematical modeling for solutions to problems in the life sciences.
Text: -
Text Sections Covered: -
Comments: -
Topics: -
Submitted by: DongMei Liu
Date Submitted: 12/08/09
 

Math 351

Title:

Algebraic Thinking for the Middle School Teacher

Prerequisites: Math 252, 251 or 107
Comments: Investigation of mathematical patterns and sequences, recursive and explicit forms; tabular, algebraic and graphical representations of sequences and functions. Applications of Geometers Sketchpad, Fathom and Tinkerplots dynamic software.
Text: Software bundle: Fathom dynamic Statistics, Geometers Sketchpad dynamic geometry and Tinkerplots bundle, from Key Curriculum Press. Algebra Connections, by Ira J. Papick, University of Missouri ISBN-10: 0131449281 and ISBN-13: 9780131449282 Publisher: Prentice Hall Copyright: 2007
Text Sections Covered: -
Comments: -
Topics: Problem Solving & Mathematical Reasoning
Number Systems (emphasizing integers & rational numbers)
Algebraic Reasoning
Statistics & Probability (Fathom statistics program, graphing calculators)
Topics in Informal Geometry (Sketchpad Version 4, KaleidoMania!)
Selected topics (applications, history, ethnomathematics, etc.)
Submitted by: Libby Knott
Date Submitted: 6/24/09
 

Math 360

Title:

Probability & Statistics

Prerequisites: -
Comments: -
Text: Probability & Statistics for Engineering & Sciences, 6th Edition by Devore; Published by Duxbury
Text Sections Covered: Chapter 1. Introduction [Sec. 2-4] (1 week)
Chapter 2. Probability [Sec. 1-5] (1 week)
Chapter 3. Discrete Random Variables [Sec. 1-6] (3 weeks)
Chapter 4. Continuous Random Variables [Sec. 1-4, 6] (3 weeks)
Chapter 5. Joint Probability Distributions [Sec. 1-5] (.5 week)
Chapter 6. Point Estimation [Sec. 1] (.5 week)
Chapter 7. Statistical Intervals [Sec. 1-3] (1.5 weeks)
Chapter 8. Tests of Hypotheses [Sec. 1-4] (1.5 weeks)
Chapter 9. Two-Sample Inference [Sec. 1-3] (1.5 weeks)
Chapter 12. Simple Linear Regression [Sec. 1, 2, 5] (1.5 weeks)
Comments: -
Topics: -
Submitted by: Jave Pascual(for Spring 2005)
Date Submitted: 3/10/06
 

MATH 364

Title:

Principles of Optimization

Prerequisites: Math 202 or Math 220
Comments: Students need a background in linear algebra.
Text: Introduction to Mathematical Programming, Operations Research; 4th Edition by W. L. Winston & M. Venkataramanan (Thomson -Brooks/Cole, 2003).
Please make sure to purchase a copy with the CD-ROM for LINDO software.
Text Sections Covered: Selected sections in Chapters 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7 and 8 or 9
Comments: Emphasis of the course will be on model formulation and algorithms. The software package LINDO or AMPL will also be introduced.
Topics: (1) An Introduction to Model Building
(2) Basic Linear Algebra
(3) Introduction to Linear programming
(4) The Simplex Algorithm
(5) Sensitivity Analysis and Duality
(6) Transportation, Assignment, and Transshipment Problems
(7) Networks Models or
(8) Integer Programming
Course web page
Submitted by: A. Ariyawansa
Date Submitted: 7/6/07
 

Math 370

Title:

Introduction to Statistics for Engineers

Prerequisites: -
Comments: -
Text: Engineering Statistics, 3rd Edition by Montgomery, Runger, & Hubere; Published by Wiley
Text Sections Covered: -
Comments: Taught by Statistics Department.
Topics: -
Submitted by: --
Date Submitted: --
 

Math 375

Title:

Vector Analysis

Prerequisites: Math 273 & 315
Comments: -
Text: Introduction to Vector Analysis, 7th Edition by H. Davis & D. Snider; Published by Hawkes Publishing
Text Sections Covered: The whole textbook is covered, including some Appendices. A few sections may be omitted.
Comments: -
Topics: Review of vector algebra and vector functions, tensor calculus and differential forms, differential operations on scalar and vector fields, scalar and vector potentials, line and surface integrals, Stokes Theorems, Fundamental Theorem of Vector Calculus, constrained optimization.
Submitted by: Jan Kucera (for Fall 2004)
Date Submitted: 3/10/06
 

MATH 398

Title:

Mathematical Snapshots

Prerequisites: Math 172
Comments: Character, life work, and historical importance of mathematicians from various eras and branches of mathematics
Text: A Concise History of Mathematics, 4th Edition by Struik. Published by Dover
Text Sections Covered: ----
Comments: Each student will write an independent term paper on a mathematical topic not discussed in class such as: a biographical sketch of a famous mathematician; the development of an important mathematical concept; the evolution of mathematical notation; a famous controversy over priority of discovery; an exposition of mathematics in an ancient culture, etc. The paper should be written carefully with respect to content, format, and language.
Topics: Egyptian and Babylonian Mathematics; Arithmetic of Central and South America; Ancient Chinese Mathematics; Early Greek Mathematics; Apollonius, Archimedes, and Euclid; Ancient Indian Mathematics; Reawaking of European Mathematics; Irish Mathematicians; The Story of Two Greek Mathematicians of Modern Times; Sophia Kobalevskaya and Mathematics in 19th Century Russia; The Life of Alan Turing; Women in Mathematics.
Submitted by: Mike Kallaher
Date Submitted: 5/20/08
 

Math 401

Title:

Introduction to Analysis I

Prerequisites: Math 301
Comments: Properties of sets and sequences of real numbers; limits, continuity, differentiation and integration of functions; metric spaces.
Text: A Friendly Introduction to Analysis, 2nd Edition by Witold A.J.Kosmala; Published by Prentice Hall
Text Sections Covered: We shall cover most of Chapter 1 -- Chapter 6.
Comments: -
Topics: Sequences; limit theorems; Cauchy sequences; monotone sequences; limits of functions; continuity, differentiation; Riemann integral.
Submitted by: Alex Panchenko
Date Submitted: 5/20/08
 

MATH 402

Title:

Introduction to Analysis II

Prerequisites: Math 401
Comments: ----
Text: A Friendly Introduction to Real Analysis, 2nd Edition, by Witold A. J. Kosmala; Published by Pearson/Prentice Hall
Text Sections Covered: Chapters 7-11, Sequences of Functions, Infinite Series, A Glimpse Riemann Integral
Comments: Continuation of Math 401
Topics: Sequences and series of functions; Infinite series of constants; Continuous real-valued functions of n variables; Partial derivatives and the differential; The Chain Rule and Taylors Theorem; Linear Transformations and Matrices
Submitted by: Alexander Panchenko
Date Submitted: 4/24/09
 

Math 403

Title:

Higher Geometry

Prerequisites: Math 220 or permission of the instructor
Comments: Students are expected to have had a high school geometry course and are somewhat familiar with the basics of analytic geometry. The course has natural historical and philosophical aspects, and it reviews some of the more intellectual challenging problems solved over the centuries. Although Intended for potential secondary teachers, the course should be rewarding to many liberal arts students.
Text: Geometry: A Historical Perspective, by M. Kallaher
Text Sections Covered: -
Comments: Format will be a mixture of group discussion, small group interaction, lecture. Grading will be based on group problem sets, tests and one project.
Topics: The theme will be historical with emphasis on the development of geometry from the time of Euclid to modern times. During the semester various types of geometries (including non-euclidian, projective, finite) will be discussed.
Submitted by: Mike Kallaher
Date Submitted: 6/5/13
 

MATH 415

Title:

Intermediate Differential Equations

Prerequisites: Math 315 or equivalent
Comments: ----
Text: Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos, by S. Strogatz; Addison-Wesley, 1994. Paperback printing, 2000.
Text Sections Covered: We will cover parts I and II (Chapters 1 through 8 with selected applications) and some of part III.
Comments: -
Topics: flows on a line; bifurcations in 1D; flows on a circle; linear systems in 2D; the phase plane; linear stability analysis; local bifurcations; Newtonian, conservative and reversible systems; index theory; gradient systems; stability; Poincare-Bendixson Theorem; Dulacs criterion; limit cycles; relaxation oscillations; quasi-periodicity; Poincare maps; two time scales; Hopf bifurcations; nonlocal bifurcations in 2D; the Lorenz equations, chaos and 1D maps -- with numerous examples!
Submitted by: MARK SCHUMAKER
Date Submitted: 12/08/06
 

Math 416/516

Title:

Simulation Methods

Prerequisites: Cpt S 121 or 203
Comments: -
Text: A First Course in Monte Carlo; 1st Edition by George Fishman; Published by Brooks & Cole, 2006. Supplemental: MATLAB Primer, T.A. Davis and K. Sigmon, 7th Edition, Chapman & Hall, 2005.
Text Sections Covered: Chapters 2-3, 5-6
Comments: This course is subject to be updated.
Topics: 1) Independent Monte Carlo
2) Sample Generation
3) Pseudorandom Number Generation
4) Variance Reduction
Submitted by: Alan Genz
Date Submitted: 9/14/07
 

Math 420

Title:

Linear Algebra

Prerequisites: Math 220 or Math 230, and Math 301
Comments: This course is only offered in the Fall semester.
Text: Linear Algebra, by Friedberg, Insel and Spence, 4th Ed. Published by Prentice Hall
Text Sections Covered: Chapters: 1-2, 4-6
Comments: -
Topics: Inner product spaces; Linear transformations and matrices; Determinants; Diagonalization; Canonical forms.
Submitted by: Michael Tsatsomeros
Date Submitted: 5/20/08
 

Math 421

Title:

Algebraic Structures

Prerequisites: Math 301
Comments: Properties of algebraic structures and their homomorphisms, semi-groups, groups, rings, unique factorization domains, fields.
Text: A First Course in Abstract Algebra, 7th Edition by J. Fraleigh; Published by Addison Wesley
Text Sections Covered: Chapters: 1-18
Comments: -
Topics: We shall cover basic results about groups, rings and fields, together with some of their applications.
Submitted by: Judi McDonald
Date Submitted: 10/11/07
 

Math 423/523

Title:

Statistical Methods for Engineers and Scientists

Prerequisites: Prerequisite for Math 423: Math 220, 360 or other statistics course. Math 523 prerequisite is graduate standing. Credit not normally granted for both 423 and 523
Comments: This class is a continuation of the material presented in Math/Stat 360 and is the compliment of those topics that are virtually indispensable for engineers and scientists in an age of global competition for manufacturing quality items. The principle focus is design of experiments with applications to quality control where analysis of data from industry will be an integral part of the course.
Text: Probability and Statistics for Engineering and the Sciences, 7th Edition by Jay L. Devore; Published by Duxbury Press.
Text Sections Covered: Chapters 7 - 13.
Comments: All methods will be illustrated with actual problems originating from industry during the laboratory sessions. These sessions will provide instruction in, and implementation of, commonly used statistical software such as Minitab or SAS.
Topics: The topics incorporated in the syllabus are:
Chapter 7, 8, 9: Confidence Intervals, Hypothesis Tests (2 weeks)
Completely Randomized Designs, Block Designs (1 week)
Chapter 10: One-Way Model ANOVA (3 weeks)
Chapter 11: Multi-Factor ANOVA, Fractional Factorials (4 weeks)
Chapter 12: Simple Linear Regression (2 weeks)
Chapter 13: Multiple, Polynomial and Nonlinear Regression (3 weeks)
Submitted by: JAVE PASCUAL
Date Submitted: 5/20/08
 

Math 424

Title:

Topology

Prerequisites: -Math 273, 301
Comments: -
Text: -Topology; 2nd Edition by J. Munkres; Published by Prentice Hall
Text Sections Covered: -
Comments: -Subject to update.
Topics: -
Submitted by: -Eric Remaley
Date Submitted: -6/07
 

Math 425

Title:

Conceptual Aspects of Mathematics

Prerequisites: College-level math course.
Comments: Same as T&L 425
Text: -
Text Sections Covered: -
Comments: -
Topics: -
Submitted by: DongMei Liu
Date Submitted: 12/08/09
 

Math 431/531

Title:

Intersections of Culture and Mathematics

Prerequisites: Instructor approval or junior/senior standing or graduate standing in mathematics or mathematics education.
Comments: Credit not granted for both Math 431 and Math 531
Text: Radical Equations: Civil Rights from Mississippi to the Algebra Project, by Robert P. Moses and Charles E. Cobb, Jr.; Mathematics and Multi-Ethnic Students: Exemplary Practices, by Evelyne Germain-McCarthy and Katharine Owens; Reading Packet.
Text Sections Covered: An analysis of intersection of culture, gender & math. Including, but not be limited to: eurocentrism & androcentrism in math, the role of culture in the development, learning of math, a study of gender and race/ethncity differences in math, their social consequences, factors influencing these differences, historic roles of women people of color.
Comments: -
Topics: Critically evaluated eurocentrism & androcentrism in math.
Explore the ways culture affects the development & learning of math.
Investigate gender and race differences in math and their sociological consequences.
Examine factors influencing gender & and race differences in mathematics and learning styles.
Critically evaluate research on the intersections of gender, race, mathematics, and mathematics education.
Understand culturally responsive teaching.
Create projects for high schools and/or middle schools that are suitable for a culturally responsive classroom.
Submitted by: Sandy Cooper
Date Submitted: 5/20/08
 

Math 432/532

Title:

Mathematics for College and Secondary Teachers

Prerequisites: Teaching experience or intention; Calculus and linear algebra.
Comments: Credit not granted for both Math 432 and 532
Text: Mathematics for High School Teachers: From an Advanced Perspective, First Edition, by Usiskin, Peressini, Marchisotto, Stanley; published by Prentice Hall, 2003,
Text Sections Covered: to be decided
Comments: --This course is intended for students of senior status or beyond. However, any juniors who will not be here in two years should take this course now for it will be offered in the spring of even years only.
--This course will look at the mathematical content in courses taken prior to Calculus from an "advanced perspective", meaning we will use mathematics from your college career to develop a deeper understanding of the mathematics content in the high school curriculum.
--For graduate students enrolled in Math 532, some of their homework will be different than the undergraduates in Math 432; some of their work on exams, homework, and projects will have a higher level of mathematics embedded and expected.
Topics: Pre-algebra, algebra functions and geometry examined from an advanced perspective
Submitted by: Duane DeTemple
Date Submitted: 4/27/09
 

MATH 440/540

Title:

Applied Mathematics I

Prerequisites: Math 315. Credit not granted for both Math 440 and 540.
Comments: Partial differential equations; Fourier series and integrals; Bessel functions; Calculus of variations; Vector calculus; Applications.
Text: Advanced Engineering Mathematics, 9th edition, by Erwin Kreyszig.
Text Sections Covered: Selected sections from Chapters 5, 6, 11 and 12.
Comments: Course subject to be updated.
Topics: series solutions of ordinary differential equations; the method of Frobenius; development of Bessel functions of the first and second kinds;Legendre polynomials; Sturm-Liouville problems;Laplace transforms and inverse transforms, and their use in solving differential equations; the Wave Equation and solution; the Heat Equation and solution.
Submitted by: Eric Remaley
Date Submitted: 5/20/08
 

MATH 441/541

Title:

Applied Mathematics II

Prerequisites: Math 315
Comments: Complex variable theory including analytic functions, infinite series, residues, and conformal mapping; Laplace transforms; applications. Credit not granted for both Math 441 and 541.
Text: Advanced Engineering Mathematics, 9th Edition by Kreyszig; Published by Wiley
Text Sections Covered: Chapters 1 - 8, Complex Numbers, Analytic Functions, Elementary Functions, Complex Integration, Series Representations for Analytic Functions, Residue Theory, Conformal Mapping, The Transforms of Applied Mathematics. Chapters 13-18, 6.
Comments: ----
Topics: Complex numbers
Analytic functions
Elementary functions in the complex plane
Cauchy-Riemann equations
Complex integration
Cauchy's integral theorem
Derivatives of complex functions
Convergence of sequences and series
Taylor series and Laurent expansions
Residue theorem
Comformal mapping
Linear fractional transformations
Applications to potential theory
Laplace transforms and applications
Submitted by: Edward Pate
Date Submitted: 5/20/08
 

Math 443

Title:

Applied Probability

Prerequisites: Math 172; 220
Comments: -
Text: Probability and Stochastic Processes, by Yates and Goodman (2nd Edition).
Text Sections Covered: Chapter 1, Sections 1.1-1.6, 1.8, 1.10; Chapter 2, Sections 2.1-2.9; Chapter 3, Sections 3.1-3.5, 3.7-3.8; Chapter 4, Sections 4.1-4.10; Chapter 6, Sections 6.1-6.4, 6.6-6.7; Chapter 7, 7.1-7.3.
Comments: Subject to change.
Topics: -
Submitted by: Jave Pascual
Date Submitted: 5/20/08
 

MATH 448/548

Title:

Numerical Analysis

Prerequisites: Math 171, 172, 220, 273, and 315;
computer programming ability using Matlab, Maple, C, C++, or Fortran.
Comments: The course is designed to teach science and engineering students how to derive and use standard numerical methods for mathematically posed problems from science and engineering. The course is cross-listed with Cpt S 430/530. It is normally offered Fall and Spring semesters.
Text: Numerical Analysis, 8th Edition by Burden & Faires; Published by Brooks/Cole 2005
Text Sections Covered: Most of Chapters 1-6 will be covered. The Matlab Primer is supplementary.
Comments: Computing:
--Computing is an essential part of the course and some of the assignments will require computer programming work. Completion of these computing assignments if necessary for receiving a good course grade. The course textbook authors provide FORTRAN, C and MATLAB software (see text page vii for access information) for algorithms discussed in the text. I strongly recommend using the MATLAB software. The supplementary text provides detailed MATLAB information and there are on-line MATLAB information links at the course website, where there is also information about on-line access to MATLAB for all students in the course.
Topics: This course will focus on theory and algorithms for:
1. Floating Point Arithmetic (1 week)
2. Solution of Linear Systems (2 weeks)
3. Interpolation (3 weeks)
4. Solution of Nonlinear Equation (3 weeks)
5. Numerical Integration (2 weeks)
6. Solution of Ordinary Differential Equations (3 weeks)
For details, see the course schedule.
Submitted by: A.C. Genz
Date Submitted: 3/14/06
 

Math 453/553

Title:

Graph Theory

Prerequisites: Math 220
Comments: -
Text: Modern Graph Theory by Bollobas; Published by Springer
Text Sections Covered: Chapter I and selected topics from chapters II-VI, VIII depending on available time.
Comments: Subject to update.
Topics: Basic definitions, Chapter I; vector spaces & matrices assoc with graphs, Chapter II.3; Mengers Thm., matchings; Chapters III.1-III.3; Extremal Problems; Chapters IV.1-IV.3; Coloring; Chapters V.1-V.3; Runsey Theory, and Chapter VI; Cayley Diagrams VIII.1
Submitted by: Matt Hudelson
Date Submitted: 6/26/07
 

Math 456/556

Title:

Introduction to Statistical Theory

Prerequisites: Stats 430 or 443, credit not granted for both Stat 456 and 556
Comments: -
Text: Introduction to Probability and Mathematical Statistics, 2nd Edition by Bain & Engelhandt; Published by Duxbury
Text Sections Covered: We aim to cover Chapters 8-12 from the text, emphasizing certain sections more than the others. Time permitting, we would cover either Chapter 13 or Chapter 14.
Comments: This is a course on Mathematical Statistics. The aim is to have an in-depth understanding of the theory behind Inferential Statistics. Substantial importance will be given to proofs of fundamental results in Mathematical Statistics.
Topics: Limiting theorems
Sampling Distributions
Point Estimation
Sufficiency and Completeness of statistics, confidence intervals
Hypothesis testing.
Submitted by: Krishna Jandhyala
Date Submitted: 5/21/08
 

Math 464

Title:

Linear Optimization

Prerequisites: Math 220 and Math 273, Math 364 is recommended.
Comments: Familiarity with elementary concepts of linear algebra including matrices and vectors is expected along with experience in doing proofs. Cooperative course taught by WSU, open to U of I students (Math 464).
Text: Introduction to Linear Optimization by D. Bertsimas & J. Tsitsiklis; Published by Athena Scientific (1997); A recommended book: Linear Programming and Network Flows, by Bazaraa, Jarvis and Sherali, published by Wiley.
Text Sections Covered: The first part of the course will be based on the first 7 chapters of the text. Most of the second part of the course would be devoted to topic (9). References to topics (7), (8) and (9) will be provided as they are treated in class. Sections from Chapters 1,2,3,4 and 6.
Comments: -
Topics: The course will consist of two parts. The first part will consist the following topics.
(1) Introduction.
(2) A brief review of some results from linear algebra and convex analysis including convex sets and functions.
(3) The simplex method.
(4) Starting solutions and convergence.
(5) Duality, sensitivity and the dual simplex algorithm.
(6) The decomposition principle.
In the second part, we shall consider problems that arise in the following areas.
(7) Allocation and scheduling.
(8) Approximating data by linear functions.
(9) Integer programming. Formulating linear programs.
Submitted by: K.A. Ariyawansa and Robert Mifflin
Date Submitted: 12/08/09
 

Math 466/566

Title:

Optimization in Networks

Prerequisites: Math 325 or 364, or knowledge of linear programming.
Comments: Credit not granted for both Math 466 and 566.
Text: Network Flows: Theory, Algorithms, and Applications, by Ahuja, Magnanti, and Orlin, Prentice-Hall.
Text Sections Covered: --
Comments: Network flow problems form an important class of linear optimization problems with applications to several areas including chemistry, computer networking, engineering, public policy, scheduling, telecommunications, transportation, and many others. This course will provide an integrated view of the theory, algorithms, and the applications of key network optimization problems. Emphasis will be on powerful algorithm strategies, rigorous analysis of the algorithms, and data structures for their implementation.
Topics: network optimization problems including shortest path, maximum flow, minimum cost flow, minimum spanning tree, multi-commodity flow, assignment, covering, postman, and salesman.
Submitted by: Bala Krishnamoorthy
Date Submitted: 5/22/08
 

Math 486/586

Title:

Mathematical Modeling in the Natural Science

Prerequisites: Math 315
Comments: Credit not granted for both Math 486 and 586
Text: -
Text Sections Covered: -
Comments: -
Topics: 1. Projectile problems and regular perturbation (wks. 1-2)
2. Biological population dynamics and singular perturbation (wks. 3-5)
3. Soap films and the calculus of variations (wk. 6)
4. Heat conduction (wks. 7-8)
5. Diffusive instabilities and linear stability (wks. 9)
6. The Rayleigh-Benard convection problem (wks. 10-12)
7. Nonlinear stability (wks. 13 7 15)
8. Discrete applications (wk. 14):
---a. The minimum fraction of popular votes necessary to elect the President of the United States
---b. The Fibonacci sequence and finite difference populations
---c. The mathematics of finance
Submitted by: David Wollkind (for 2005)
Date Submitted: 3/14/06
 

Math 494

Title:

Seminar in Mathematical Biology

Prerequisites: one course in math and one course in biology
Comments: Oral presentation of research approaches, research results and literature review of mathematical biology including mathematical modeling of biological systems.
Text: -
Text Sections Covered: -
Comments: May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 4 hours; S, F grading
Topics: -
Submitted by: DongMei Liu
Date Submitted: 12/09/09
 

Math 500

Title:

Proseminar

Prerequisites: All Teaching Assistants in Math must sign up for this class
Comments: -
Text: No
Text Sections Covered: -
Comments: May be repeated for credit; cumulative maximum 2 hours; S, F grading.
Topics: Orientation from Chair and department staff
Department procedures
"Teaching First" - a Guide for New Mathematicians
Mini-lesson
"Right-to-know" video
Department Tour
Submitted by: DongMei Liu
Date Submitted: 12/09/09
 

Math 501

Title:

Real Analysis

Prerequisites: Math 402
Comments: metric spaces, convergence, continuous functions, infinite series, differentiation and integration of functions of one and several variables.
Text: Principles of Mathematical Analysis, 3rd Edition by Walter Rudin; Published by McGraw Hill
Text Sections Covered: Chapters 2 to 9
Comments: -
Topics: Basic topology
sequences and series
Continuity and Differentiation
Riemann-Stieltjes Integrals
Sequence and Series of Functions
Contraction Principle
Inverse Function Theorem
Submitted by: Hong-Ming Yin/DongMei Liu
Date Submitted: 12/09/09
 

MATH 502

Title:

Introduction to Functional Analysis

Prerequisites: Math 420, Math 501
Comments: If there are questions about prerequisites material contact the instructor
Text: Introductory Functional Analysis with Applications, latest edition by Erwin Kreyszig; Published by John Wiley & Sons.
Text Sections Covered: Chapters 1-4.
Comments: -
Topics: Vector Spaces
Normed Spaces
Banach Spaces
Linear Operators
Representations of Linear Functions
Hilbert spaces
Riesz Representation
Hahn-Banach Theorem
Weak and Strong Convergence

Open mapping and Closed Graph Theorems
Submitted by: Alex Khapalov
Date Submitted: 4/28/09
 

Math 503

Title:

Complex Analysis

Prerequisites: Math 501
Comments: Cooperative course taught by jointly by WSU and UI (Math 531)
Text: Theory of Complex Functions, by Reinhold Remmert, Springer-Verlag, 1991, ISBN 0-387-97195-5
Text Sections Covered: Chapters 0 -- 14
Comments: -
Topics: Complex functions and continuous functions
Complex differential calculus
Holomorphy and conformality
Modes of convergence, power series
Transcendental functions
Complex integral calculus
Integral theorems and power series development
Consequences of the integral theorems
Meromorphic functions
Laurent series
Residue calculus and its application to definite integrals
Submitted by: David Watkins
Date Submitted: 5/22/08
 

Math 504

Title:

Measure & Integration

Prerequisites: Math 501
Comments: -----
Text: Primary text: Analysis, 2nd Edition by E.H. Lieb & M. Loss, Published by AMS
Secondary text: Measure theory and fine properties of functions, by L.C. Evans & R.F. Gariepy
Text Sections Covered: Chapters: 1, 2, 4 and parts of chapters 7 and 8
Comments: ------
Topics: Measures
measurable sets and functions
Lebesgue measure and integral
L^p-spaces
Integral inequalities
Some facts about Sobolev functions
Submitted by: ALEXANDER PANCHENKO
Date Submitted: 3/15/04
 

Math 505

Title:

Abstract Algebra

Prerequisites: Math 421 or equivalent
Comments: -
Text: Topics in Algebra, 2nd Edition by Herstein; Published by Wiley
Text Sections Covered: Review Chapters: 1, 2.1-2.10 Cover Chapters: 2.11-2.14, 4, 5
Comments: -
Topics: Basic group theory will be reviewed. The Sylow Theorems will be covered in detail. Modules and Fields will also be studied in some depth.
Submitted by: Judi McDonald
Date Submitted: 10/11/07
 

MATH 507

Title:

Advanced Theory of Numbers

Prerequisites: General mathematical maturity
Comments: ------
Text: Cryptanalysis of Number Theoretic Ciphers, 1st Edition by Samuel Wagstaff; Published by Chapman & Hall/CRC Press
Text Sections Covered: Chapters 1-14, 17, 18, 23-25
Comments: We will review the major topics from elementary number theory, then look at how number theory is used in cryptology. Special emphasis will be on factoring of large numbers and solving the discrete logarithm problem. These concerns will lead to some more advanced topics.
Topics: Primes
Divisibility
Congruencies
Factoring methods
Discrete logarithms
Private and public key cryptosystems
Cryptanalysis
Submitted by: WILLIAM WEBB
Date Submitted: 5/22/08
 

Math 508

Title:

Topics in Applied Analysis

Prerequisites: Math 502
Comments: Actually only a rudimentary knowledge of linear algebra, differential equations, advanced calculus, and complex variables are prerequisite.
Text: No text
Text Sections Covered: -
Comments: -
Topics: The course basically deals with two topics:
1. The variety of ways in which a problem Lu = f can be solved where L is a linear matrix, differential, or integral operator.
2. Various asymptotic representation of integrals I(k) as k goes to infinity, where k is a large positive parameter.
-- The methods of solution for (1) include eigenvector expansion and direct approaches, the former introducing the concepts of adjoint linear operators and eigenvalue problems while the latter develop inverse operators, Greens functions, and distributions. Then these two approaches are related by means of spectral representations of operators.
-- For (2) appropriated asymptotic expansions of integrals of particular forms are deduced by Watsons Lemma, LaPlaces Method and the Method of Stationary Phase, respectively. Finally these general expressions are applied to deduce asymptotic representations for the gamma, error and Bessels functions as well as Legendre polynomials.
Submitted by: David Wollkind
Date Submitted: 3/15/06
 

Math 510

Title:

Topics in Probabilities and Statistics

Prerequisites: One 3 hour statistics course.
Comments: Graduate-level counterpart of Math 410; Credit not granted for both Math 410 and 510.
Text: -
Text Sections Covered: -
Comments: For more information, see Stat 510 (taught by Department of Statistics).
Topics: -
Submitted by: General Catalog 2006-2007
Date Submitted: 5/22/08
 

Math 511-01

Title:

Advanced Linear Algebra

Prerequisites: Math 420 or equivalent
Comments: -
Text: Matrix Analysis, by Roger Horn & Charles R. Johnson; Published by Cambridge University Press
Text Sections Covered: Selected material from Chapters 1-6.
Comments: We will focus on spectral theory of matrices, including unitary equivalence, similarity, normal matrices, Jordan canonical form, as well as material on inner product spaces and matrix norms. More details will be given during the first lecture.
Topics: Eigenvalues similarity
normal and Hermitian matrices
canonical forms
norms
eigenvalue localization
Submitted by: Michael Tsatsomeros
Date Submitted: 5/22/08
 

Math 512

Title:

Ordinary Differential Equations

Prerequisites: Math 402
Comments: -
Text: Differential Dynamical Systems, James Meiss (SIAB, 2007)
Text Sections Covered: Chapters 1-5 and selected sections of latter chapters
Comments: Computer:
We will learn something about XPPAUT, a software package for making a range of computations related to the initial value problem for ODEs. This has been developed by Bard Ermentrout, of the University of Pittsburgh.
Topics: Overview of modeling using ODEs; systems of one, two and three or more equations. Linear Systems including exponentials of operators; the fundamental solution theorem; semisimple-nilpotent decomposition; Floquet theory. Proof of existence and uniqueness using the contraction mapping theorem; dependence on initial condition and parameters; maximum interval of existence. Flows; global existence; linearization; stability; Lyapunov functions, Hartman-Grobman theorem; Omega-limit sets, Attractors; Stability of periodic orbits; Poincare maps. Homoclinic and heteroclinic orbits; Local stable manifold theorem; Global manifolds; Center manifolds; Further selected topics
Submitted by: Mark Schumaker
Date Submitted: 4/28/09
 

Math 525

Title:

General Topology

Prerequisites: Math 402
Comments: -
Text: Topology, 2nd Edition by J. R. Munkres; Published by Prentice Hall
Text Sections Covered: Chapters 1-5, chapter 9 (time permitting) will form the core of the course and occupy essentially the first 13 weeks.
Comments: -
Topics: Topological Spaces (basis, sub-basis, etc.)
Closure and Interior Operators
Product, Quotient, Subspaces
Connectedness
Compactness, Local Compactness, etc.
Separation Axioms
Metric Spaces, Metrizability
Compactification
Submitted by: David Watkins
Date Submitted: 4/29/09
 

Math 531

Title:

Intersections of Culture and Mathematics

Prerequisites: -
Comments: -
Text: -
Text Sections Covered: -
Comments: See Math 431 for description.
Topics: -
Submitted by: -
Date Submitted: 5/29/08
 

Math 543

Title:

Approximation Theory

Prerequisites: Math 448
Comments: Students will be required to complete some computer projects; some computer programming experience is necessary.
Text: No Text Required
Text Sections Covered: Phillips: chapters 1-3, 5-7; Boggess and Narcowich: chapters 1-7
Comments: All students in the class are encouraged to use the course information available at
http://www.math.wsu.edu/faculty/genz/ap.html
Topics: The course will focus on theory and algorithms for:
1. Polynomial Interpolation (1 week)
2. Best Polynomial Approximation (3weeks)
3. Multivariate Polynomial Interpolation (1 week)
4. Numerical Integration (1 week)
5. Spline Approximation (1 week)
6. Fourier Approximation (3 weeks)
7. Wavelet Approximation (4 weeks)
For details, see the course syllabus.
Submitted by: A. Genz (for Spring 2005)
Date Submitted: 3/16/06
 

MATH 544

Title:

Advanced Matrix Computations

Prerequisites: Math 448
Comments: Students should have a firm grasp of elementary linear algebra and some computer programming experience. Knowledge of or willingness to learn MATLAB is essential.
Text: Fundamentals of Matrix Computations, by David Watkins, 2nd Edition; Published by Wiley and Sons, May 2002, ISBN 0-471-21394-2
Text Sections Covered: Chapters 1-5, part of 6.
  • Chapter 1. Gaussian Elimination
  • Chapter 2. Linear System Sensitivity
  • Chapter 3. Least Squares Problems
  • Chapter 4. Singular Value Decomposition
  • Chapter 5-6. Eigenvalues and Eigenvectors
    For more details, see the course schedule.
  • Comments: --
    Topics: Theoretical and practical issues associated with:
      -- solution of linear systems of equations;
      -- linear least-squares problems;
      -- eigenvalue problems.
    Submitted by: DAVID WATKINS
    Date Submitted: 5/29/08
     

    Math 545

    Title:

    Numerical Analysis of Evolution Equations

    Prerequisites: Math 448
    Comments: -
    Text: Numerical Partial Differential Equations: Finite Difference Methods; 1st Edition by J.W.Thomas; Published by Springer
    Text Sections Covered: -
    Comments: Subject to update.
    Topics: -
    Submitted by: Seregy Lapin
    Date Submitted: 6/07
     

    Math 555

    Title:

    Topics in Combinators

    Prerequisites: -
    Comments: Combinatorics, generating functions, recurrence relations, inclusion-exclusion, coding theory, experimental design, graph theory.
    Text: Concrete Mathematics, by Graham, Knuth and Patashnik, 2nd edition, Addison Wesley Publishing
    Text Sections Covered: Chapters 1,2,3,5,6,7
    Comments: Combinatorics has become a catch-all discipline of mathematics encompassing such things as graph theory, enumeration, analysis of algorithms, recursion, et al. At the heart of it all is the desire to count things in an elegant manner.
    Topics: Important counting numbers - binomial co-efficiency, recurrence sequences
    Sterling numbers etc.
    Counting techniques including generating functions
    Identities.
    Submitted by: William Webb
    Date Submitted: 5/29/08
     

    Math 560

    Title:

    Partial Differential Equations I

    Prerequisites: Math 402
    Comments: Partial differential equations and other functional equations: general theory, methods of solution, applications. Cooperative course taught by WSU, open to UI students (Math 540)
    Text: Partial Differential Equations 0-8218-0772-2
    Text Sections Covered: -
    Comments: See Math 561 for more information.
    Topics: -
    Submitted by: DongMei Liu
    Date Submitted: 12/08/08
     

    Math 561

    Title:

    Partial Differential Equations II

    Prerequisites: Math 315/Math 440 (Math 540) or get permission from the instructor
    Comments: --
    Text: Partial Differential Equations, by L.C. Evans, American Mathematical Society Publication
    Text Sections Covered: Chapter 5, Chapter 6, Chapter 7 and Chapter 8 (8.1 and 8.2)
    Comments: The materials from Chapter 1 to Chapter 4 are not related to Chapter 5-8. There is no need to know the materials from Chapt.1 to 4 (the classical theory).
    Topics: This course will cover the modern theory of partial differential equations. (It does not rely on the materials from Math 560).
      (1) Weak Derivatives and Sobolev Spaces
      (2) General Theory of Elliptic Equations
      (3) General Theory of Evolution Equations (Parabolic and hyperbolic).
      (4) Calculus of Variation.
    Submitted by: Hong Ming Yin
    Date Submitted: 5/29/08
     

    Math 563

    Title:

    Mathematical Genetics

    Prerequisites: Math 273; MBioS 301; Stat 412. 430, or 443
    Comments: -
    Text: Evolutionary Theory: Mathematical & Conceptual Foundations; 1st Edition by Sean H. Rice; Published by Sinauer / Gene Genealogies, Variation & Evolution: A Primer in Coalescent Theory by Hein; Published by Oxford Press
    Text Sections Covered: -
    Comments: Subject to update.
    Topics: -
    Submitted by: Richard Gomulkiewicz
    Date Submitted: 6/07
     

    Math 564

    Title:

    Nonlinear Optimization I

    Prerequisites: -
    Comments: A good background in linear algebra and advanced calculus is required. Familiarity with a programming language would be helpful.
    Text: Numerical Optimization, Second Edition by J. Nocedal & S.J. Wright; Published by Springer-Verlag, 2006
    Text Sections Covered: Chapters 1-9 and 12, and Appendix A of the textbook.
    Comments: -
    Topics: (a) Introduction including some motivating applications.
    (b) Brief review of material from analysis and linear algebra.
    (c) Fundamentals of unconstrained optimization.
    (d) Line search methods.
    (e) Trust-region methods.
    (f) Conjugate gradient methods.
    (g) Quasi-Newton methods.
    (h) Calculating derivatives.
    (i) Derivative free optimization.
    (j) An introduction to the theory of constrained optimization.
    Submitted by: K.A. Ariyawansa
    Date Submitted: 5/30/08
     

    Math 565

    Title:

    Nonlinear Optimization II

    Prerequisites: -
    Comments: A good background in linear algebra and advanced calculus is required. Familiarity with a programming language would be helpful.
    Text: Numerical Optimization, Second Edition by J. Nocedal & S.J. Wright; Published by Springer-Verlag, 2006
    Text Sections Covered: Chapters 12-18 and the Appendix of the textbook
    Comments: -
    Topics: (a) Introduction to optimization problems and algorithms.
    (b) Brief review of material from linear algebra and advanced analysis.
    (c) Theory of constrained optimization.
    (d) Linear programming emphasizing interior point methods.
    (e) Fundamentals of algorithms for nonlinear constrained optimization.
    (f) Quadratic programming.
    (g) Penalty, barrier, and augmented Lagrangian algorithms for nonlinear constrained optimization.
    (h) Sequential quadratic programming algorithms for nonlinear constrained optimization.
    Submitted by: K. A. Ariyawansa
    Date Submitted: 5/30/08
     

    Math 566

    Title:

    Optimization in Networks

    Prerequisites: -
    Comments: Familiarity with linear programming (Math 364/464) and a background in linear algebra will be helpful. Students should know how to write simple codes in MATLAB or a similar package.
    Text: Ahuja, Magnanti, and Orlin - Network Flows: Theory, Algorithms, and Applications. Prentice-Hall. ISBN: 013617549X
    Text Sections Covered: Portions from chapters 2-7, 9, 11, 13, 15-17
    Comments: Apart from proof-type exercises, students will try to code many of the algorithms discussed in MATLAB. Course web page: http://www.wsu.edu/~kbala/Math566.html
    Topics: Network representations
    complexity analysis
    flow decomposition algos
    shortest paths: label setting algos
    shortest paths: label correcting algos
    max-flow min-cut theorem
    max-flow: preflow push algos
    min-cost flow: basic algos
    minimum spanning trees
    Lagrangian relaxation
    multicommodity flows
    generalized flows
    Submitted by: Bala Krishnamoorthy
    Date Submitted: 12/08/09
     

    Math 567

    Title:

    Integer and Combinatorial Optimization

    Prerequisites: Math 464 or equivalent or permission of instructor
    Comments: Students should be familiar with linear programming concepts (Math 464), and concepts from linear algebra. They should also know how to write simple codes in MATLAB or a similar package.
    Text: Laurence A. Wolsey -- Integer Programming and Class Notes. John Wiley and Sons, ISBN: 0-471-28366-5
    Text Sections Covered: Portions from chapters 1, 3, 7, 8, 9, 13
    Comments: Apart from proof-type exercises, students will try to solve several real-life problems using the software package AMPL and MATLAB.
    Course web page: http://www.wsu.edu/~kbala/Math567.html
    Topics: 0--1 and mixed integer programming formulations
    facility location, lot-sizing, traveling salesman problem,
    binary expressions, conjunctive normal form (CNF)
    strength of formulations, sharp formulations
    branch-and-bound, theory and practice
    theory of valid inequalities
    Chvatal-Gomory cuts, lift-and-project cuts
    integer lattices and lattice basis reduction
    Hermite normal form (HNF) and Diophantine equations
    Computational complexity
    Submitted by: Bala Krishnamoorthy
    Date Submitted: 05/01/07
     

    Math 570

    Title:

    Mathematical Foundations of Continuum Mechanics I

    Prerequisites: Advanced calculus and differential equations
    Comments: -
    Text: Mathematics Applied to Deterministic Problems in the Natural Sciences, by C.C.Lin & L.A.Segel; Mathematics Applied to Continuum Mechanics, by L.A.Segel, both Published by SIAM
    Text Sections Covered: This basically is an introduction to the foundations and techniques of modeling natural phenomena from a deterministic continuous viewpoint. It includes the following topics to be presented in a two semester sequence: Cartesian tensors, eigenvalue problems, the continuum hypothesis, Eulerian and Lagrangian coordinates, the Reynolds transport theorem, the DuBois-Reymond lemma, conservation of mass, balance of linear and angular momentum, the principle of local stress equilibrium, conservation of energy, the Clausius-Duhem inequality, equations of state and constitutive relations, boundary conditions and surfaces of discontinuity, asymptotic expansions, regular and singular perturbation theory, and linear and nonlinear stability analyses. These topics are developed in the context of various problems in the continuum with an emphasis on fluid mechanics but with an inclusion of metallurgical solidification and chemical Turing pattern formation as well.
    Comments: There are ten required problem sets and a take home final containing case studies closely related to those presented in class.
    Topics: 1. Couette and Poiseuille flows, wks. 1 & 2.
    2. Rayleigh impulsive flow, wk. 3.
    3. Linear stability analysis of Rayleigh-Benard convection, wks. 4 & 5.
    4. Regular perturbation theory, wks. 6 & 7.
    5. Singular perturbation theory, wks. 8-10.
    6. Blasius boundary layer flow past a flat plate, wks. 11 & 12.
    7. Jump-type boundary conditions at surfaces of discontinuity, wk. 13.
    8. Nonlinear stability analyses of model systems, wks. 14 & 15.
    Submitted by: David Wollkind
    Date Submitted: 12/08/09
     

    MATH 571

    Title:

    Math Foundation of Continuum Mechanics II

    Prerequisites: Math 570
    Comments: Although nominally a continuation of Math 570, the approach employed essentially guarantees that all developments will be self-contained.
    Text: Mathematics Applied to Deterministic Problems in the Natural Sciences, by Lin & Segel
    Mathematics Applied to Continuum Mechanics, by L. A. Segel, Dover Press.
    Text Sections Covered: ----
    Comments: There are ten problem sets each worth 40 points covering the topics enumerated above for a total of 400 points. No examinations.
    All three lessons in week 15 will be slide shows highlighting research areas. These deal with weakly nonlinear stability
    Topics: 1. Couette and Poiseuille flows (wks. 1 & 2)
    2. Rayleigh impulsive flow (wk. 3)
    3. Linear stability analysis of Rayleigh-Benard convection (wks. 4 & 5)
    4. Regular perturbation theory (wks. 6 & 7)
    5. Singular perturbation theory (wks. 8-10)
    6. Blasius boundary layer flow past a flat plate (wks. 11 & 12)
    7. Jump-type boundary conditions at surfaces of discontinuity (wk. 13)
    8. Nonlinear stability analysis of model systems (wks. 14 & 15).
    Submitted by: DAVID WOLLKIND
    Date Submitted: 12/08/09
     

    Math 572

    Title:

    Quality Control

    Prerequisites: Math 360 or Math 443
    Comments: --
    Text: Statistical Quality Assurance Methods for Engineers by S. Vardeman and J.M. Jobe, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Additional Reference: Statistical Methods for Quality Improvement, by T. P. Ryan
    Text Sections Covered: Chapter 1 - Introduction; Chapter 2, Section 5.1 - Simple Quality Assurance Tools; Chapter 3 - Process Monitoring I: Sections 3.1-3.5; Chapter 4 - Processing Monitoring II; Chapter 5 - Process Characterization and Capability Analysis: Sections 5.1-5.4; Chapter 8 - Sampling Inspection: Sections 8.1-8.2; Chapter 6 - Experimental Design (Time permitting)
    Comments: Cooperative course taught jointly by WSU and UI
    Topics: Gage R&R Studies; Statistical graphics for quality assurance; X-bar, S, R charts; np, p, c, u charts; Alarm rules; Average run length; EWMA, CUSUM charts; Multivariate charts; Process characterization and capability analysis; Prediction and tolerance intervals; Propagation of error; Attributes acceptance sampling; Rectifying inspection and fraction nonconforming; Variables acceptance sampling.
    Submitted by: Jave Pascual
    Date Submitted: 6/2/08
     

    MATH 573

    Title:

    RELIABILITY THEORY

    Prerequisites: Math/Stat 443 (calculus-based elementary theory of probability and statistics)
    Comments: Cooperative course taught jointly by WSU and U of I (Math 571).
    Text: Statistical Methods for Reliability Data, 1998 Edition by W. Q. Meeker and L. A. Escobar; Published by John Wiley and Sons, Inc.
    Text Sections Covered: Chapters: 1-4, 6-8, 15, 17 - 19
  • Chapter 1 - Reliability Concepts and Reliability Data
  • Chapter 2 - Models, Censoring, and Likelihood for Time-to-Failure Data
  • Chapter 3 - Nonparametric Estimation
  • Chapter 4 - Failure-time Distributions
  • Chapter 6 - Probability Plotting and Choosing a Failure-Time Distribution
  • Chapter 7 - Parametric Likelihood Concepts: Exponential Distribution
  • Chapter 8 - Maximum Likelihood: Log-location-Scale Based Distributions
  • Chapter 15 - System Reliability Concepts and Methods
  • Chapter 17 - Failure-Time Regression Analysis
  • Chapter 18 - Accelerated Test Models
  • Chapter 19 - Accelerated Life Tests
  • Comments: ----
    Topics: Coherent Systems, Association
    Reliability Concepts and Reliability Data
    Models, Censoring, and Likelihood for Failure-Time Data
    Location-Scale-Based Parametric Distributions
    Maximum-Likelihood and Nonparametric Estimation
    Probability Plotting
    Submitted by: JAVE PASCUAL
    Date Submitted: 6/2/08
     

    Math 574

    Title:

    Topics in Optimization

    Prerequisites: Advanced multivariable calculus and a programming language.
    Comments: Decent level of analytical ability and the interest to learn problems from biology required. Course will be adapted to accommodate students from non-mathematical backgrounds.
    Text: An Introduction to Bioinformatics Algorithms, by Neil C. Jones and Pavel A. Pevzner; Published by MIT Press; ISBN: 0262101068
    Text Sections Covered: Portions from Chapters 2-6, 8, 9, 11
    Comments: Students will be graded through homework assignments and projects -- there will be no exams. Main emphasis will be on learning how to apply optimization techniques rather than on the theory behind them.
    Check course web page: www.wsu.edu/~kbala/Math574.html
    Topics: 1. Molecular biology primer
    2. Overview of algorithms and optimization (algorithms and complexity; various classes of optimization problems)
    3. Dynamic programming and its applications (global string alignment; local sequence alignment; multiple alignment; algebraic methods)
    4. Graphs and applications (graphs and DNA sequencing; protein classification)
    5. Discrete and continuous optimization; and applications (linear and integer programming; non-linear programming)
    6. Protein folding (secondary structure prediction; lattice model, energy minimization; genetic algorithm for protein folding; protein structure and geometry)
    7. Project presentations and other topics.
    Submitted by: Bala Krishnamoorthy
    Date Submitted: 12/08/09
     

    Math 581

    Title:

    Seminar in Analysis

    Prerequisites: --
    Comments: Interested graduate students may register this course with variable credits (up to 3 credits), provided that his/her advisor agrees.
    Text: (a) The mathematics of financial derivatives, by P. Wilmott, S. Howison and J. Dewynne; (b) Mathematical Modeling and Methods of Option Pricing, by Lishang Jiang; World Scientific Publication.
    Text Sections Covered: --
    Comments: The focus of this course will be on Financial Mathematics. We will also have talks on PDEs and related topics from time to time.
    Topics: Financial Mathematics, PDEs and related topics
    Submitted by: Hong Ming Yin
    Date Submitted: 12/08/09
     

    Math 591

    Title:

    Seminar in the History of Mathematics

    Prerequisites: -
    Comments: -
    Text: History of Mathematics: A Brief Version, 1st Edition by V. Katz; Published by Addison/Wesley
    Text Sections Covered: -
    Comments: -
    Topics: -
    Submitted by: Mike Kallaher
    Date Submitted: 6/07
     

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